Motion picture content rating system

Motion picture content rating system

 

Motion picture content rating systems are used to label the suitability of motion pictures films, videos, television programs, etc. for viewing by children and teenagers, usually according to appropriateness for particular age groups and the presence of violence, sex, drug use, etc. The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) in the United States has been using such a system since 1968; it replaced earlier state-by-state labeling regulations that were not applicable across borders.

 

Rating System

G, PG, PG-13, R, NC-17. Motion pictures are released theatrically in most parts of the world with either a pre-determined certificate from a national film censorship board or no rating at all. Theatrical releases in North America are rated by an organization known as Classification and Rating Administration (CARA). The G classification is generally appropriate for ages three and older. This rating does not indicate endorsement by CARA.

The PG classification is generally appropriate for ages eight and older. It may contain some material that parents may find unsuitable for younger children. This rating does not indicate endorsement by CARA. The content of television programs, released in home video format, are rated by an organization known as Television Parental Guidelines (TVPG). This is also an age-based classification. TVPG-G is generally appropriate for all ages, but may include some material that parents may find unsuitable for younger children.

The TV-PG-V classification is generally appropriate for ages six and older. It may contain some material that parents may find unsuitable for younger children. This rating does not indicate endorsement by CARA. The PG-13 classification is generally appropriate for ages thirteen and older, but parents are cautioned to learn more about the film before taking their young children with them. Some material may be inappropriate for preteenagers.

 

Classifications & Ratings

The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) is responsible for setting standards for movie ratings. The MPAA bases its ratings on a list of factors that includes violence, language, sex, nudity and drug use. The ratings include G (general audiences), PG (parental guidance suggested), PG-13 (parents strongly cautioned) and R (restricted). A film rated R cannot be viewed by anyone younger than 17 without an adult present.

The MPAA uses ratings to give parents a brief description of what they can expect when taking their children to see a film. The film’s rating is based on several different factors, including violence, language, sex and nudity. A movie with an R-rating may contain some adult language or violence that could be too intense for younger viewers.

Like movie ratings, TV show ratings help viewers understand what to expect from each show. The FTC rates television programs based on different age groups: G (general audiences), PG (parental guidance suggested), PG-13 (parents strongly cautioned) and R (restricted). No one under 17 can watch a program with an R-rating without an adult present. Unlike movie ratings, TV show ratings are not always consistent from one country to another. It’s important to understand how local rating systems differ from those in your country. You may have to make some changes or edits to your video if you plan on releasing it internationally.

 

Understanding What’s Covered by the Ratings

Ratings can range from G (General Audiences) to NC-17 (No One 17 and Under Admitted). Each of these ratings covers a different level of maturity for movies. Here’s a breakdown of what each rating means A movie rated G is suitable for all ages. There may be some mild language, but there won’t be any violence. In fact, there probably won’t even be any kissing! These types of movies are great if you want to watch something with your family or friends that everyone will enjoy.

 

Helping Young Audiences Understand Movie Ratings

Kids might not understand why a movie is rated one way or another. The Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) job is to let people know what’s inside films and TV shows, so they can decide if it’s appropriate for themselves or their family. How does it do that?

The MPAA rates movies in two ways: G (general audiences) and PG (parental guidance suggested). Movies that are rated PG-13 are intended for mature audiences only. Why? Movies with a lot of violence, strong language, sexual material or adult themes may not be suitable for people under 13 years old. A TV-MA program is designed to be viewed by adults and therefore may be unsuitable for children under 17.  When you watch a movie, pay attention to what’s happening on screen so you can decide if it’s right for your family.

The ratings don’t tell everything about what’s inside a movie—but they do give you important information about why it was made and who should see it. Take advantage of all your resources—including Common Sense Media—to help guide your decisions about what media is appropriate for yourself or your family.

 

MPAA & The RIAA (Motion Picture Association of America, Inc. & Recording Industry Association of America) Guidelines

The Motion Picture Association of America is an American trade association that represents all aspects of motion picture production and distribution, including major Hollywood studios. The RIAA (Recording Industry Association of America) is an organization founded in 1952 to develop voluntary industry standards and promote fair dealings in recording practices. The MPAA/RIAA have established ratings for movies based on how appropriate they are for different age groups.

The Motion Picture Association of America and The Recording Industry Association of America have ratings systems in place to alert parents and viewers about inappropriate themes or violence in films. A film’s rating refers to age-appropriateness, not quality. Films without a rating may be assumed to be appropriate for all audiences. Films rated G (general audiences) should be suitable for all ages.

PG (parental guidance suggested) – Some material may not be suitable for children. Parents are urged to give parental guidance—meaning that they may want to consider whether their children under age 14 should view it, and whether children over age 14 should view it with parental guidance. The MPAA/RIAA have established ratings for movies based on how appropriate they are for different age groups.

 

Digital Rating Systems – G, PG, and TV-Y, TV-Y7, TV-G, etc.

Motion picture ratings have been in place since 1968, when a code of conduct was adopted by an advisory board and adopted by member studios of Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). The association’s ratings are used by most theaters worldwide. In 1990, a TV Parental Guidelines program for television was introduced. Ratings vary from one country to another. Several systems have been created to classify motion pictures and television programming based on their suitability for certain viewers.

 

Why Are There Differences In The Film Ratings And TV Program Ratings?

It’s a good question, because technically TV programs and films are different things. And in fact, before 1968 there were no ratings for television shows at all; it was not until Congress passed The National Association of Broadcasters Code For Television Programming Services to assist parents in controlling children’s viewing habits that ratings started appearing on TV programs.

Film ratings are assigned by a different organization: The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA). Their ratings have evolved over time, starting with G in 1918, moving to various iterations of PG in 1930 and 1940, before settling on today’s MPAA G rating. Prior to 1968, it was all just called passes or recommends and there were no specific ratings at all.

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